Sunday, December 1, 2013

Korean fermented napa cabbage - Baechu Kimchi

how to make Korean fermented napa cabbage - Kimchi

Happy December peeps,
Christmas songs hitting radio stations, malls, and stores...you are definitely feeling the holiday spirit everywhere around here. Don't you agree that people are just a bit more happier in December, then everybody is back to grumpy selves in January :D

Now let's talk about Kimchi! 

Recipe finally made it on my blog and the biggest reason is not only 'cause I love kimchi so much, but because I received overwhelming amount of requests in the last few months with the same question: "how do I make my own kimchi?" - So here it is!
I am also asked a lot especially in stores when I purchase tofu how does it tastes, or can you make your own. I never tried making tofu, but maybe I should do a little research and make my own.  But that will wait for a while, until then I will enjoy store bought. Ok...I was off the subject for a bit there, let's continue...

What is kimchi? 

Kimchi is a traditional as well as national fermented Korean side dish made of vegetables with a variety of ingredients. It is a staple of every Korean household, therefor it's an important part of Korean culture. Kimchi can be eaten as an accompaniment to almost any meal, and it is served as a side dish with every meal. 
There are many different varinties of kimchi, that's why I named it in the title "napa cabbage", to be specific what kind of kimchi I am presenting today. This particular one is called "mak baechu kimchi" because it is chopped into bite size pieces for quick fermentation, simpler serving, and easy consumption later. The most popular and recognizable kimchi out of all varieties is made from napa OR Chinese cabbage (baechu)- however cucumber, daikon or white radish, scallions kimchi and many more depending on the season are also loved and made by Koreans. Kimchi can be non-spicy, mild and very spicy depending on how much chili powder you are using. The taste of fermented kimchi have pinch of sourness, slight burn in your mouth from spiciness , prudent smell, and kimchi should have a crunch when you bite it. 

NOTE* Napa cabbage is lighter in color than other Chinese cabbages such as bok choy, which is also sometimes called Chinese cabbage. 

I can't wait until my kimchi ferment for few months, so I can make delicious stews such as Kimchi Jjigae, Budae Jjigae or use it for my Gourmet Ramen Soup, and of course kimchi pancakes, so good!  I hope you will try it and please don't be intimidated, because it is simple side dish recipe, full of flavor, nutrition and I must add pure deliciousness. 


How to make Korean fermented napa cabbage - Kimchi

Korean Fermented Napa Cabbage - Baechu Kimchi
INGREDIENTS:
  • 2 large Chinese Cabbage, about 3 lb each (Napa Cabbage) or 3 smaller size 
  • 1/2 cup salt
  • 6 cups water 
Vegetables:
  • 1 small sized Korean white radish (Moo) or medium Daikon radish. 
  • 1 large carrot (80g), or two smaller ones *optional 
  • 3 Green onions, chopped
  • 4 oz Chives (100g)
seasoning/sauce:
  • 1 Tbs. Sweet rice flour + 1/2 cup water
  • 1 Cupful Red hot pepper powder  (use less for less spicy or more, or none for white kimchi)
  • 2 Tbs. Fish Sauce
  • 1 Tbs. Oyster Sauce (or fish sauce) 
  • 1 Tbs. Sugar 
  • 1/3 cup Salted shrimps (brine shrimp) 
  • 1/3 Onion, medium 
  • 1 Asian pear
  • 8 garlic cloves
  • 1 Tbs. crushed ginger
  • Salt to taste, if necessary

Directions:

  1. Cut the cabbage lengthwise and separate it with your hands. Then cut into quarters, then chop into bite size pieces.  Place in the big bucket and wash few (3-4) times to get it really clean. Prepare salt water, add 1/4 cups of salt with about 6 cups of water. Pour it over the cabbage and start mixing and turning your cabbage every 20-30 minutes for the next 1 1/2 to 2 hrs.
  2. Make porridge by mixing water with sweet rice powder/flour on a medium temperature. Stir until it becomes thick and smooth in texture. Take it off the stove and set aside to cool down. 
  3. While cabbage is braining and porridge is cooling off, start with the sauce.
  4. Julienne white radish, large carrot, chop scallions, chives, scallions, brine shrimp and set aside
  5. On the other side, roughly chop onion, peel garlic and use whole cloves, slice peeled pear and ginger. Put it in the food processor with sugar, oyster sauce, and (optional if allergic or vegan), add 1/2 cup of water and process until well combined. Add salt only if necessary to taste or more oyster sauce.
  6. Add Chili powder (gochugaru) in cooled porridge, stir then pour the sauce  (from the step 5.) out of the food processor in the porridge. Stir again very well and mix in with Julienne vegetables. Set aside until ready to be used.
    how to make kimchi
  7. Once the Cabbage brained for at least hour and half, wash few times under cold water, drain really good and dry the bowl/bucket, then place cabbage back to dry bowl/bucket. Cabbage will have balance between sweetness and saltiness, it will get bit softer but still firm/crunchy enough.
  8. Now the final step after washing the salty water off. Pour the sauce and other vegetables over the cabbage. Gently mix with your hands, massage it (use gloves).
  9. Put it into airtight containers, but try to press down the cabbage because of the air.
  10. Leave it on the room temp for 2-3 days, then place it in the fridge (the best if you use glass container or a large jar/s) 
After 7 days you will already have bit fermented cabbage and Kimchi juice will start to appear. but I love one after a month or so for salads, 3 months and after it's perfect for stews.
NOTE*
  • Yes, you can make kimchi without sweet rice porridge. I like to use it because it pulls all the ingredients together. But it is optional.
  • No, you do not have to add any seafood products. If you are able to get it or eat it, I recommended but it is optional.   
  • I like to keep it in the garage and I wrap the container with plastic bag to eliminated the odor as much as possible. Even though it is sealed completely with the lid, kimchi smell will escape. Usually after 3 days I put it in the fridge. 
  • All the products can be purchased online, or in Asian market. Some ingredients could be found even in local grocery stores.  
  • I like TO ADD ABOUT SODIUM LEVEL, if you never made kimchi before be careful if you are using salted shrimps and oyster sauce or fish sauce...both ingredients are salty so please add little bit at the time and taste. I found this one perfect for me, but we all have different taste buds. If you are not adding any of above, then use SALT to TASTE! 



 I hope you will have an amazing week ahead!


Your friend,


Sandra 



Sandra's Easy Cooking by sandraseasycooking.com is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at sandraseasycooking.com. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at secooking@gmail.com.

18 comments :

  1. It looks fantastic! I'm in desparate need of fresh Kimchi! Feel like pinching some of yours, Sandra. ;) I haven't made my own Kimchi for a while, so I'm feeling *guilty* about it too! lol

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    1. Haha...I made big container. I wish i was closer so we can make weekend kimchi project :D Thanks Sue, and have a great week!

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  2. Hi Sandra :) We have a large Korean population where we live and my boys have grown up eating all kinds of things I had never heard of when I was younger, including Kimchi. It's so nice to see a recipe for it. They would be pretty impressed if I whipped this up for them. Gorgeous photos!

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    1. That's great! I know that they would be impressed by their mama :D Thanks Val, enjoy your evening!

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  3. I have made rice paste kimchi and non-rice paste kimchiu, and without a doubt the kimchi made with rice paste lasts longer and tastes better. If you haven't tried it, collard greens makes really good kimchi too!

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    1. Hi Andi,
      I agree with you, I still like kind of quick non rice porridge kimchi, but so much better like you said with it. I love collard greens but I never made or tried kimchi from it. Do you blanched it before seasoning it? I would love to know how you did it. Thanks for stopping by....just checked your blog and I am loving it.

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  4. We love Korean food! Thanks for sharing this recipe!

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  5. Looks amazing! Thanks for the recipe.

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  6. The last shot is super gorgeous!!!!!!!!!!!! Practically I can pick it up and eat it. So real!! I need to try making kimchi one day. You'll be my great teacher then. :)

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    1. Awww..thank you so much Nami, shall be your teacher hehehe! I hope you will make it, because it's so worth it! :D Thanks again dear! xo

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  7. I really like the look of this recipe, it looks like it packs a punch and I love that xx

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  8. Hi Sandra! The picture of this kimchi is extremely inviting. Can't wait to try this since I love kimchi and all things spicy. I wonder if it is possible to include the weights of ingredients that you call for such as "large" cabbage or one carrot or one radish. Mentioning size seems to be so subjective. I would really appreciate it if you could include weights when sharing a recipe. Thank you and I hope you enjoys the holidays.

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    1. Hi Amy,

      I just added..but if your Napa cabbage have like 8 Lb there is no reason to panic just more kimchi :D I buy in bulk so it's hard to tell sometimes how much because it's not really an issue if you add more veggies than the recipe suggested.
      I will try to measure Korean radish, because at this moment I really don't have one so I cannot tell you exact weigh..but Let me send you link that I found so you can see visually approx. size: http://www.maangchi.com/ingredient/korean-radish

      Oh and here is the great video 101 Korean ingredients by Marja...I hope her videos help you in picking some ingredients! :) Thank you and have a great Holiday season, Amy!

      http://www.awesomegroove.com/show_image.php?show=1281&type=fo

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  9. How important is the asian pear? I remember watching my grandmother make kimchi but for some reason I do not recall seeing her add a pear

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    Replies
    1. Kitty,
      It is completely optional! It adds just a bit of sweetness, and balance without changing the overall taste when it's fermented. That goes for porridge too, some ppl don't add it and some do, but I really like how it pulls everything together. I just had it today (14 days of fermentation) with ramyeon and it was so good!

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